Enterprise Products Partners L.P.

SEC Filings

424B5
ENTERPRISE PRODUCTS PARTNERS L P filed this Form 424B5 on 02/02/2018
Entire Document
 


Table of Contents

CERTAIN ERISA CONSIDERATIONS

The following is a summary of certain considerations associated with the purchase and holding of the notes by employee benefit plans that are subject to Title I of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended (“ERISA”), plans, individual retirement accounts and other arrangements that are subject to Section 4975 of the Internal Revenue Code or employee benefit plans that are governmental plans (as defined in Section 3(32) of ERISA), certain church plans (as defined in Section 3(33) of ERISA), non-U.S. plans (as described in Section 4(b)(4) of ERISA) or other plans that are not subject to the foregoing but may be subject to provisions under any other federal, state, local, non-U.S. or other laws or regulations that are similar to such provisions of ERISA or the Internal Revenue Code (collectively, “Similar Laws”), and entities whose underlying assets are considered to include “plan assets” (within the meaning of ERISA or Similar Laws) of any such plan, account or arrangement (each, a “Plan”).

General Fiduciary Matters

ERISA and the Internal Revenue Code impose certain duties on persons who are fiduciaries of a Plan subject to Title I of ERISA or Section 4975 of the Internal Revenue Code (an “ERISA Plan”) and prohibit certain transactions involving the assets of an ERISA Plan and its fiduciaries or other interested parties or disqualified persons. Under ERISA and the Internal Revenue Code, any person who exercises any discretionary authority or control over the administration of such an ERISA Plan or the management or disposition of the assets of such an ERISA Plan, or who renders investment advice for a fee or other compensation to such an ERISA Plan, is generally considered to be a fiduciary of the ERISA Plan.

In considering an investment in the notes of a portion of the assets of any Plan, a fiduciary should consider the Plan’s particular circumstances and all of the facts and circumstances of the investment and determine whether the investment is in accordance with the documents and instruments governing the Plan and the applicable provisions of ERISA, the Internal Revenue Code and any Similar Law relating to a fiduciary’s duties to the Plan including, without limitation, the prudence, diversification, delegation of control, exclusive benefit and prohibited transaction provisions of ERISA, the Internal Revenue Code and any other applicable Similar Laws. In addition, a fiduciary should determine whether the investment will result in the recognition of unrelated business taxable income by such Plan.

Prohibited Transaction Issues

Section 406 of ERISA and Section 4975 of the Internal Revenue Code prohibit ERISA Plans from engaging in specified transactions involving “plan assets” with persons or entities who are “parties in interest,” within the meaning of ERISA, or “disqualified persons,” within the meaning of Section 4975 of the Internal Revenue Code, unless an exemption is available. A party in interest or disqualified person who engages in a non-exempt prohibited transaction may be subject to excise taxes and other penalties and liabilities under ERISA and the Internal Revenue Code. In addition, the fiduciary of the ERISA Plan that engages in such a non-exempt prohibited transaction may be subject to penalties and liabilities under ERISA and the Internal Revenue Code. The acquisition and/or holding of notes by an ERISA Plan with respect to which Enterprise Parent, Enterprise or the underwriters are considered a party in interest or a disqualified person may constitute or result in a direct or indirect prohibited transaction under Section 406 of ERISA and/or Section 4975 of the Internal Revenue Code, unless the investment is acquired and is held in accordance with an applicable statutory, class or individual prohibited transaction exemption.

In this regard, the U.S. Department of Labor has issued prohibited transaction class exemptions, or “PTCEs,” that may provide exemptive relief for direct or indirect prohibited transactions resulting from the sale, purchase or holding of the notes. These class exemptions include, without limitation, PTCE 75-1, respecting certain transactions involving ERISA Plans and broker-dealers, reporting dealers and banks, PTCE 84-14 respecting transactions determined by independent qualified professional asset managers, PTCE 90-1 respecting

 

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